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Banif employees plant trees at Foresta 2000


01 December 2011

As a Maltese bank with the local community at heart, Banif Bank (Malta) plc is committed to contribute towards the conservation of the environment. In this regard, Banif has sponsored an area within Foresta 2000, the afforestation project which is administered by the Ministry for Rural Affairs and the Environment, in collaboration with Din l-Art Ħelwa and BirdLife Malta. Foresta 2000 was inaugurated eleven years ago to mark the beginning of the new millennium.

In November, Banif employees met at the reserve in Għadira and spent the afternoon planting a variety of trees namely Żnuber (Aleppo Pine) - the Maltese pine tree; Ballut (Holm Oak) – a tree which was often seen on the Maltese island but which is becoming increasingly rare and Siġar ta’ l-Għargħar (Araar Tree) - the national Maltese tree which is also rare in the wild. After planting a number of trees, the Banif group joined the park manager for an enjoyable and relaxing walk in the reserve where they could learn more about the different trees that are being cultivated in this project.

A representative from the Banif Sports and Social Committee, who was responsible for organising this event, stated,” This initiative is in line with the Bank’s Sustainability Strategy. It is a tangible way of showing our commitment to help counteract the Bank’s footprint in carbon emissions. Planting more trees in the environment is one of the many ways to enforce the Bank’s ongoing effort of taking care of the community we live in”.

Foresta 2000 aims to create a reserve and plant a Mediterranean forest that will serve as an ideal habitat for birds and other fauna as well as act as an attraction for both Maltese and foreigners wanting to explore and enjoy nature.

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